The Ultimate Guide To Adding Products To Cart Using Ajax In WooCommerce

Working with WooCommerce brings me a lot of joy. If you are a developer, I hope the experience I’m sharing below will be helpful to you.

How to add a simple product to cart using ajax

Adding a simple product via ajax is very simple. From any page, you send the following request, via POST or GET:

{
add-to-cart: product_id,
quantity: x
}

So, for example, I have my product here which has ID 30:

woocommerce-simple-product

Now, if I want to add this product to cart, I simply append the following data to any URL of my website:

?add-to-cart=30&quantity=2

In this example, I’m going to add two products to cart.

For example, I append the string above to the cart url, which makes the full URL like so:

http://localhost/wordpress/cart/?add-to-cart=30&quantity=2

If I open that URL in my browser, I will be redirected to cart page and the product will be in cart.

Cool, isn’t it 🙂

Now, simple product is simple. How about variable products? I requires a bit more work.

 

How to add a variable product to cart using ajax

With variable product, you need to find the variation ID to add the exact product you need to cart. If you use the parent product ID, you may see an error, which is not surprised at all. Let me show you.

I have this product:

woocommerce variable product

As you can tell from the product page, it’s a variable product (select boxes to select the variations, price in range).

Now, the product id is 31. If I execute the following URL:

http://localhost/wordpress/cart/?add-to-cart=31&quantity=2

You’ll see this error:

It is not hard to understand, right? Since the product is a variable product, you will need to find the variation ID.

Where to find the variation ID? Let’s do an inspection, shall we?

If you right click on one of the select boxes (to select variation) and click on inspect (on Chrome), you’ll see this:

As you can see, our select box is inside a form. That form has an attribute called data-product_variations . This attribute contains the JSON data of all variations of our product. Let’s extract the data using jQuery.

extract variable product data in woocommerce

as you can see that, I select the form with the selector .variations_form.cartif you know jQuery or CSS selector, this part shouldn’t be strange to you.

I was able to extract the JSON string from the attribute data-product_variations and turned that into javascript object using JSON.parse.

Now, you can see that the data is an array contains 4 elements. Since my product has two attributes “Color” and “Size”, it’s not surprising that there are 4 variations.

Let’s expand one of the 4 variations and see what we have:

There are a tons of data and surely you’ll see the variation_id is 150.

That’s all we need to add this product to cart.

Now, let’s navigate to this URL:

http://localhost/wordpress/cart/?add-to-cart=150&quantity=2

Sure enough, the product is added to cart.

successfully add variable product to cart using custom URL

Interesting, right?

Now, you are able to add simple and variation products to cart, which is great. However, if you notice the cart at the navigation bar. It’s not updating if you send the requests via ajax. How can you fix that?

How to add products to cart and update the cart widget(at the navigation bar)

To add the products to cart and then update the cart widget, you’ll need a different approach. At least, you need a different URL to send the request to.

Are you ready?

You still can send the request to any URL of your site, however, this time, you need a new parameter:

?wc-ajax=add_to_cart

Let’s open the browser’s console and enter the following data:

jQuery.post('http://localhost/wordpress/cart/?wc-ajax=add_to_cart', {product_id: 150, quantity: 10}, function(response){ console.log(response); })

We are going to print out the response from the server. It contains some very useful data that let us update the cart.

Now, hit enter then wait a second and this is what we got back:

The most important piece of data is the fragments. It is an array of objects. The key of each object is the css selector of cart-related element and the value of that key is the HTML content of that element.

Updating the cart now should be trivial. Consider it’s your homework 😉

Conclusion

As you can see, adding WooCommerce products via ajax is quite simple. With the knowledge you gain from this post (hopefully), I hope you can use it and make some awesome applications.

 

 

 

How To Add Custom CSS/Javascript In Elementor Free Version

If you are using the free version of Elementor, you’ll notice that adding custom css to the page isn’t supported. Elementor says that it’s a feature of the pro version.

custom css in elementor free version
custom css in elementor free version

What can you do? Are you going to upgrade? Well, if you can, I recommend you to do so. It’s worth the price.

However, if you just need to add some CSS and not quite ready to upgrade yet, let me show you a walk around.

Adding custom CSS in Elementor free version

Now, let’s find the HTML element and drag it into your page:

Now, you’ll see the HTML on your page look like this:

It doesn’t look very attractive. However, you don’t need to worry about that. It will not show up on your final page (the page that your visitors see).

Now, let’s hover your cursor over the HTML element, you will see the edit icon appears:

Then, you’ll see the HTML box appears on the left of your screen:

While it says HTML code, there is nothing prevent us to enter CSS code 😉

Let’s enter some CSS code:

<style>
body p {
    color: red;
}
    
</style>

And you’ll see, my page has red text:

Now, update your page and see the changes.

Conclusion

Some of you may say that, putting style tag inside the body is not recommended. Well, that’s a thing of the past. HTML5 is finally allow the style tag in the body. If you don’t mind reading length specification page, here you go.

You don’t limit to put just css in the HTML box. You can put HTML (of course) and also javascript code. This enable some very interesting feature that you cannot do with the default elements provided by Elementor.